Archive for the ‘BBC’ Category

Spike Milligan, Peter Sellers and Harry Secombe record cover? (aka The Goons and also available in ‘vinyl’) – do you have this or other collectible albums stashed in your loft?

Escape from the War!

The ’50s witnessed the blossoming of British creative talent leading into the ’60s

Following the narrowest of escapes many years later, even after Dunkirk*,  like the Goons, our intrepid editor is delighted to report that all appears to be well, following a successul rear guard action – his mad antics will be described later – stay tuned  🙂

 

The Goons featuring

Spike Milligan, Peter Sellers, Michael Bentine and Harry Secombe

–  the other fabulous foursome!

First there came Spike Milligan

* Following the media repression and misery of the war years, they burst out from the constraints of authoritarian wartime Britain into Radio like a un-coiling spring, as an outrageously funny irreverent foursome to poke fun at the ‘wooden’ establishment that had held them in check for so long!

Although a jazz vocalist-turned-entertainer of the troups during wartime Britain, Spike Milligan could be considered as the lyrical / satyrical / anti-war / anti-authority ‘John Lennon’ founder of this particular fabulous foursome, along with co-writers Larry Stephens and Eric Sykes. Spike wrote and performed comedy sketches as part of concerts to entertain troops during the war years as a signaller in the Royal Artillery 56th. Armoured Division. Hmmm.. dad must have known of him as a member of a similar Division. The editor also remembers reading one of his amazing books  quite early on – which together with Waugh’s Scoop and Voltaire’s Candide probably didn’t do him much good either, speaking as a ‘sensible citizen‘ of questionable sensibilities, that is  🙂

Peter Sellers and Ian Carmichael as sensible citizens, tongue in cheek, in “I’m Alright Jack” – another hilarious attempt of the social classes to return to civilian life in post-war, re-uniting Britain! The whole nation’s returning soldiers appeared to be suffering from a form of collective PTSD – for which manic humour and a liberal measure of ‘for God’s sake pull yourself together man’ were prescribed! Hence – ‘I’m OK, you’re OK, we’re OK’; I’m alright, We’re alright, You’re alright, Jack?

Note: this clip doesn’t do the film justice – watch the whole film to get the full comedy including the ‘you’re not the detergent type’ Ian Carmichael clip – and Peter Sellers as the union shop steward! Sellers went to work on the character and role of “Fred Kite” with all the obsessive and meticulous attention to nuance and detail he lavished on Dr. Stragelove! When the social classes eventually and inevitably collided as Carmichael dated his pretty daughter in the spirt of the times (the new progressive and socially-mobile ‘swinging’ ’60s), ‘war’ threatened to break back-out again, but it was held in masterful restraint as ‘preventative internecine warefare countermeasures’ by union man Sellers in his hysterically funny portrayal!

Each to their own: Fred Kite – father and union man

The role of ‘sensible citizen’ as “reluctant comedian” in The Goon Show (as in real life) was played by ex. RAF intelligence officer Michael Bentine

On the editor’s young adult reading list

Serious dutiful absentee citizen Bentine (above) – then along came  Harry Secombe and Peter Sellers (below)

The editor particularly remembers the radio dialogues between Sellers, Secombe aka ‘Neddie Seagoon’ and Milligan!

The Goons was first broadcast on the BBC Home Service in 1951

 

Nick  🙂

Lancaster Bomber, 1940s

Chocks away! Cottingham.tv remembers .. the ’40s .. ’50s .. ’60s

Can you remember this BBC Radio comedy sketch featuring Peter Cook and Jonathan Miller?

Further to watching a very touching tribute to George Martin  on BBC4 last night

The sequence opens with Peter Cook, in the uniform of a senior RAF officer, entering to the sound of airmen singing heartily around a piano.

Cook Perkins! (Jonathan Miller breaks away from the singing) Sorry to drag you away from the fun, old boy. War’s not going very well, you know.

Miller Oh my God!

Cook  …war is a pyschological thing, Perkins, rather like a game of football. You know how in a game of football ten men often play better than eleven?

Miller Yes, sir.

Cook Perkins, we are asking you to be that one man. I want you to lay down your life, Perkins. We need a futile gesture at this stage. It will raise the whole tone of the war. Get up in a crate, Perkins, pop over to Bremen, take a shufti, don’t come back.

Goodbye, Perkins. God, I wish I was going too.

Miller Goodbye, sir – or is it – au revoir?,’

Cook No, Perkins.

Read on ..

The Bomber Boys

This humour was reported  as ‘too near to the bone’ at the time, verging on satire!

To be continued ..

 

Debate: have we learnt anything since the 40s?

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Despite having been ‘born at a very early age’ indeed, the editor struggles to remember anything much before the 1960s!

Will he therefore be doomed to repeat himself forever more, cught in a time-warp like a cracked record? How will he escape?

  • find out in our next exciting installment!

Nick 🙂

Having the gift of the gab is rarer than you might suppose:

lifes journey, sometimes refered to as the bumpy road, can be made a lot easier and smoothed-out if you have it and a lot rougher if you don’t!

Although Sir Terry was much liked, the Editor struggled at first to find common ground here: the Eurovision Song Contest and its organizers as headquartered in Vienna which he visited briefly last year – and bumped into on the central station there, managing to crack a joke with the Station Master about golf whilst not personally considering retirement just yet. He thought it was more funny than the Editor did at the time – but we do share a slight sense of dark humour with our Saxon friends, also having a bit more of the Blarney in common. Terry didn’t take things (work, retirement or life) at all too seriously it appeared, including humour itself that is, unlike our foreign German-speaking friends 🙂

The Editor thinks both Terry Wogan and David Bowie read and listened to music and the arts widely (as enthusiastic autodidactic learners rather than structured academically-trained thinkers) and that therefore they were able to experiment more freely with ideas.

Bawler or Boomer?

Terry was certainly a boomer, never a bawler!

Life compared to a Waltz rather than a bumpy road

As he might have said: And now for some some steam music? Why for steam radio of course – to be enjoyed by older boilers like me – and you, and you!

To be followed hastily by; and of course younger boilers like your dear self, Madam!

(In typically self-deprocating manner)

And something for Radio 2 Listeners?

This one’s definitely more for Radio 3 listeners however: –

In some ways, life for Terry could be regarded as a waltz rather than a bumpy road, rather like Johann Strauss’ steam engine where dancers glide and reciprocate in gentle circular motion with each other – rather than clash up against immovable obstacles! Perhaps this is why people liked the elegance of steam engines compared with the rough argy-bargy of engine and carriage-shunting, Diesels, buffers and all the ‘stop-go’ motion involved in marshalling yards!

Round House Turntable – seeing things in the round – good things like music come in round packages

And for a Radio 4 type discussion perhaps..

Waltz piano sheet (and pianola) music from Vienna: the popular music of the time

The Editor claims also to be 1/16th. Irish though, from those Kellys from Cork rather than neighbouring Limerick.

Let us know of your encounters – witticisms, be they informal, remote or otherwise, with Sir Terry!

Terry shared with the Editor a common reluctance for having scripts for what he said live and online, and much of what Terry said was indeed straight from the heart and un-rehearsed, which gave it a spontaneity – and also made him inadvertently a master of understatement.

read on ..

Nick

(contact: nick4182@hotmail.com)

Celebrating Individuals and Characters at Cottingham.tv:

Has Cottingham.tv become a victim of it’s own success?

Celebrating 12 months of Cottingham.tv!

We marked the 6-month point with a discussion about the changing role of journalism

We now focus on local people: we think individuals and characters matter just as much as their collected opinions!

There has been a tendency in broadcasting to separate-off opinions from individuals and characters. This makes analysis and statistics more convenient. We at cottingham.tv want to be different!

Update: We’ve changed your comments and feedback option to a social network icon which you can click on and sign in with your email or Facebook account (bottom right). This was in response to the overwhelming amount of SPAM (junk mail) received through our comments inbox. 

We also investigate the world of work (and life) and ask: 

have you noticed how repressive and ‘robotic’ work and life have now become?

Are we in danger of losing sight of our individuality as the drive for standards and consistency threaten to dominate our individual sense of worth and work in the form of overwhelming bureaucracy?

Now we are investigating and emphasizing the importance of local people and keeping local people in the loop as procedures and working and living practises become ever-more robotic and online!

Technology comes at a price which appears to be threatening individuality!

Whilst we’re on the subject of ‘robotics’: it has been asked if emulation is the best form of flattery?

We can report that much the editor’s topical content is now being picked-up and re-reported often within days by other broadcasters!

Update: in the interests of fair play, we therefore respectfully request the BBC particularly to at least quote their sources, as we do (BBC “Click” link: see below) Our recent article on hospital diagnosis exemplifying diabetes and its preventative treatment has been given full coverage yesterday seemingly without reference to Cottingham.tv! 

Our subject lead on Google has however been consolidated, so we’re achieving ‘first past the post’ status increasingly now, reaching “Page 1” for our reporting based on topical originality rather than might or rank.

Further to the editors proposals and representations over in Europe for “Europe 2.0 Dynamic Framing” on LinkedIn over the last 14 months (please google “Europe 2.0”) the work continues abroad in industry and academia: –

the latest issue of “Click” also reports on developments in ‘social or group constructionism’ as a result of the Editors Europe 2.0 initiative – using smart constructors kits, which we are now seeing the development of in the form of smart LEGO. Medical diagnosis is also reported as “Science 2.0” works its way through, opening-up more working practises.

David vs. Goliath: the battle for the individual continues – with you and on cottingham.tv!

 

Nick