Archive for the ‘Educational’ Category

The local* history of Christmas: a ‘tree-and-bird‘ story

Which came first: the turkey or the ‘tree?

Grab a last-minute bargain!

Penultimate Cottingham Thursday Market: portable camera pan-around!

Which came first: the Christmas Turkey or the Christmas Tree?

We know the turkey is a species indigenous to North America – so it can’t realistically pre-date Christopher Columbus in 1492 – but it was the enterprising Yorkshireman William Strickland * who settled here in East Yorkshire who first brought six live birds back to the UK from The Americas just 34 years later! So we can say with some certainty that Henry XIII would have been the first reigning monarch to have enjoyed eating turkey in court!

‘Modern’ traditional Christmas as we’ve known it for over a Century now in the UK and the Western World was really an invention of Queen Victoria and Prince Albert! But turkeys only became available for all to eat rather than a very expensive exclusive luxury in the 1950s

To get glimpse of life before our ‘traditional’ Christmas we take for granted mostly today, take a peak at Victorian social commentator Charles Dickens’ “Christmas Carol”. When taken together with his other works, this forms a thought- provoking and disturbing reminder to the Establishment to think of the plight of the working poor and needy at Christmas!

Nick

Posted by admin at September 1, 2016

Category: '30s, 1930s, 2016, Art, Autumn Leaves, Blues, Culture, digital media, Educational, Europe, French, Gershwin, Jazz, Music, Musicians, Summertime

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Back to the daily Grind; a new Seasonal Cultural Perspective for the Chalk Face?

 

Celebrating George Gershwin

Tip for young minds: make sure your children get exposure to this in your households along with some classical music before the anaesthetic of pop-porn hits them on their smartphones!

Finding a single composer is tricky as it appears to have French lyrics: if you listen, it definitely sounds like autumn with familiar falling leaves caught up in strengthening swirling breezes 🙂

 

Nick

2001 A Space Odyssey: Did Stanley Kubrick get it right in his iconic film?

Let’s find out!

Q. Did the space station spin at the right speed to recreate 100% artificial gravity?

Stanley Kubrick’s 2001 A Space Odyssey

Now to estimate (guess) from the film: –

  1. angular velocity in rotations per minute (hint: is it rotating about as fast as the second hand on your watch = 1.0 RPM)
  2. diameter of the rotating space station (hint the approaching space ship is about 100m in length)

Now enter your results into the Calculator: –

Here’s how it works: –

Person p standing on rotating space station floor gets subjected to artificial gravity as velocity v is constantly changing direction as it spins, but not magnitude

The Editor’s first-guess estimate for the space station from the calculator: –

Enter data into the calculator: –

Radius = 500m

Angular velocity = 1.0 RPM

Reading data out from the calculator: –

tangential velocity = 52.35987755982988 (52.4 m.s(-1) approx.)

Centripetal force as acceleration (g) = 0.5591219790816185  = 5.6 m.s(-2)

Or has the Editor got it wrong?

Q. Could 0.5591 .. g actually mean 5.591 .. g? (being careful with your measures expressed as “equivalent units”)

A. No, as the calculator also has a m.s (-2) acceleration (deceleration) readout where 1.0  g approximates to 10 m.s(-2) or expressed in plain English, the acceleration of an object falling freely under gravity (being dropped to the ground) at or around sea level accelerates at 9.81 m.s(-2) (approximately 10.0 m.s(-2) therefore)

Found: other independent estimates of space ship’s length: “Orion”

Fairground Rides – roller-coasters 🙂

5.5 g is quite unpleasant compared to 1g (as we experience our full weight standing on the ground still) – and a fairground roller-coaster ride may only ‘pull’ as much as 4 or 6g in the z axis (acting forwards and or upwards through the seated body). Pull-down, pull-back and lateral forces (x, y and y axees) are far more unpleasant and potentially damaging – height and age restrictions also apply! Injuries can and do happen – fun does have an element of danger and risk!

What’s your favourite fairground ride?

Dont miss: the world’s first zero-gravity roller coaster

Discussion

Q. Given all the problems with long-term exposure to weightlessness in space like loss of fitness, muscle and bone mass, will astronaut Tim Peake wish the designers at the ESA had made the ISS to be rotating?

Q. The Editor’s estimate of the rotation and diameter of the space station were slightly too slow and too small respectively. Can you change the figures to approach an optimum 1.0 g using the calculator? The value for g was too low at 0.55912 g – however this might be quite sufficient for long-term exposure on space missions to Mars as it may reduce the hull stresses, size of space ship and hence mass involved. Scientists will no doubt work this out! There is a further question: what happens to the human sensation of rotation when she is subjected to 1.0 or more RPM over sustained periods?

The organs of balance in the inner ear also need to be considered.

Q. Is there a centrifugal force?

A. No, since in a rotating body the  centripetal force is always acting tangentially outwards in the direction of rotation, so the supporting floor will have to be on the outside surface of the spining body to allow the occupants (also rotating) to experience gravity as a deceleration force pulling them in and towards the floor giving the impression of centrifugal force (unless they’re riding a roller-coaster – that is!)

Q. Referring to the figure above; how would you break down the calculation to include  ‘x’, ‘y’ ad ‘z’ axees to create a more costant model for ‘g’ as the space station rotates through a full 360 degrees?

Answers please to cottingham.tv!

Nick 🙂

Supervillians: this week we’re featuring the dreaded dyno-sprout!

Fear not: sprouts really needn’t taste awful!

Follow our step-by-step guide and you too can produce veges that you and your kids will actually like!

One of the problems with the well-known purveyors of “fast food” is that they too understand our preferences and especially the younger mind with it’s shorter route to gratification! We need therefore to make good ‘slow food’ more accessible like fast food! If you’re watching MacDonalds, here’s an autumnal serving tip for you!

Learn how to emulate their tricks using healthier fresher ‘un-processed food’ ingredients with our step-by-step guide ..

Our series continues with some flavorsome additions

We’ve given ourselves a 90-minute time frame for scheduling the cooking into a ‘Brussels away match’ with quarter-time, half-time and three-quarter-time sequenced activities – and even allowed ourselves 10 mins extra time for penalties!

Showing you how to bake your vegies rather than boil them to death!

 

Continued ..

Tips for midnight fridge-raiders .. keep a plate of roast veges under cling-film in the fridge – this will stop them drying-out

Continued ..

continued ..

continued ..

continued ..

Dyno-sprouts on the vine can be twice as big as their smaller relatives served-up in-the-bag .. the final reckoning is to cut them in half so they will cook within the 45 minute time-frame allotted – without requiring extra-time!

 

Final stages – finishing touches

Review and feedback

Stop Press!

Cottingham.tv is  getting noticed! Step into the Adventure this Christmas with Sky Movies!

Nick

Europe 2.0: Great Scott!

There are old pilots and there are bold pilots, but there are no old, bold pilots!

And so it is sadly with today’s politicians, their pundits, commentators (and lecturers): – going to begin this lecture by making some bold mission statements, debunking some historicism and rehashing some old  declarations – and support our retailers: –

 

But back to the future:

it was assumed that we would have made great strides discovering the ‘governing dynamics’ of the Scientific Universe at least by now – as in “Back To The Future”: –

Finding the 1.21GW required for fictional time travel by DeLorean – but only just in time!!

Time flies like an arrow ..

The DeLorean time machine’s destination date was set to 21st October 2015 Wednesday last week as Back to the Future Day, a time the scriptwriters predicted when we would have discovered and invented gravity-defying hover-boards and time-defying flux capacitors!

In our parallel future however, the 1.21 gigawatts required to power the famous Flux Capacitor is replaced by 14 TeV at CERN today, as the quest for the ‘governing dynamics’ of the universe  (hence providing us with an understanding of Gravity and Time ultimately) a “Theory of Everything” – which still eludes us.

Flux capacitor

.. but fruit flies like a banana!

‘Back to the future’ in the political democratic arena: –

In the political and democratic arena by comparison, there appears to have been be little or no change in managing basic human nature: 21/10/2015 still retains the undemocratic and dystopian economic and political structures that Biff Tannen and his henchmen inevitably created!

Karl Popper echoed this pessimistic view of utopias in his devastating critique of the use of Historicism in the Social and Political Sciences. If you want to have a deeper understanding of politics and economics, you need philosophy too – as well as an understanding of the economics of supply and demand.

So what are the governing dynamics – of government?

Popper asserted we just don’t know and that government by precedent and historical analysis of its constituent social and human sciences is incomplete i.e.  flawed.

One thing is certain however, the future is not inevitable!

Both unpredictable and unexpected things events may take place in government by politics. “Events, dear boy, events”.

In one mechanistic political future; the inventors get the upper hand with discoveries and hover boards make levitation and flux capacitors make time travel possible. In another predicted informatic or technical metaphor future as predicted here; online democracy becomes ubiquitous through online gaming and creates governmental and electoral reform! Technology can and does inevitably change our methods of working and their governance over time.

The quest for a gravity-levitating machine as a device as a mechanistic invention rather than a scientific discovery has not, as far as the editor knows, produced a sustainable lift system; only brief and small changes in an objects weight over short periods. If such a system were to do so, it would have a profound way in which we govern ourselves!

All rise!

The last time the editor researched “gravity drives” along with “perpetual or practicular motion”  was a over decade ago, so things have developed since rotating pairs of gyroscopes on a balance to measure their weight! Perhaps it is also interesting to note that so keen were the Victorians to invent and patent ‘practicular motion’ devices, the Patent Office actually wrote a clause to refuse their submission!

Europe 2.0

  • Europe 2.0 should and could (therefore) be a region and a zone where individuals, groups and Nation States can experiment creatively with participating democracy, constitutional framing, economics and social groupings – not an over-arching bureaucracy where all practices are locked-down and set in stone!
  • Europe should (following on) be thought of as a collection of dynamically-re-configurable systems rather than static immovable bureaucracies
  • In case you were pondering; – “just in time” governance as in manufacturing is not, repeat not the same as dynamic constitutional framing –but  rather, it forms an important sub-set thereof!
  • Back in the days of the early computer pioneer Ada Lovelace, we had punch cards for ‘batch card processed’ production relating to automating weavers looms. Our democracies have however remained set in stone i.e. ‘batch card processed’. This can be referred to as ‘static constitutional framing’. The result is pre-ordained, bureaucratic, exclusive and inflexible
  • Modern computing comprises real-time user interfaces like Windows. ‘Front end’ user-driven screen processes operate  ‘middleware’ business logic to manipulate ‘back end’ data processes to realize their ‘just in time’ governance in production systems – working in ‘real-time’ as “three-tier systems”
  • Take a moment to consider this: a flexible manufacturing system with its distributed economies of production can be compared with a future Europe with its distributed democracies – as a user-friendly computing machine metaphor.
  • A future Europe can therefore be considered to be an aggregate of dynamic economies and dynamic democratic constitutions with dynamic resource allocation!

 

Europe 2.0: Dynamic Constitutional Framing for Economic Growth: what are the   advantages?

  • Interactive government by eDemocracy as proposed engages electorates through real-time user (hence electorate) participation in online gaming
  • A Europe comprising a collection of dynamically-reconfigurable systems is a Constructionist Europe comprising building blocks, rather like ‘smart social LEGO’
  • Used as an antidote to, rather than a replacement for, elective representative democracy within and between bureaucracies
  • Provides pathways to implementing smarter government aka. electoral reform that will be required to match smarter technology on a country-by-country basis
  • A recipe for economic and social growth
  • Leaving the best until the last: a Super State as so described – namely Europe 2.0 – can maximize the choices available for its ‘end-users’ – namely its electorates – on demand and on an individual by individual basis. The parallel is drawn with modern automobile production where no two cars leaving the production line are necessarily identical as each has been chosen from a wide array of choices available to the individual purchaser: for example body color, engine, model, interior trim and optional extras. No two cars rolling in sequence off the production line are alike.
  • One size no longer has to fit all and we each have the right to govern and be governed by consent as self-determining individuals!

 

Nick @NPRFTEDesign

Scoop! Tax Credits

P.S. Update: for a most recent example, The UK House of Lords exercises ‘dynamic constitutional framing’ to defeat the House of Commons in today’s news!

If you are concerned the reforms will hit you as a carer, we’d like to hear from you!

Local Voice: Martin Greene champions culture at the YIBC!

Credit to Martin Greene leader of the Hull City of Culture who is “on a cultural mission” speaking out for the inclusion of Culture in the YIBC local business awards ceremony last week 05.06.2015!

“You can create all the local employment and enterprise you want, but if people don’t want to come and stay to live in the City, it is futile!”

He gave a passionate and impressive address to the conference and it’s wider televised audience and the message was to have empathy for and support people who have and pursue creative and cultural interests.

Putting individuals first rather than the blanket imposition of business models

The editor has met numerous creative local individuals over the years, having come from Hull originally, studied in London and worked abroad and returned to the region. He has met numerous struggling musicians, creative writers, artists, designers, poets and law graduates who have been unable to gain employment relevant to their skills and talents. Scholarships and support for students wishing to study in London that were available in the ’70s are now insufficient, with many potential students opting to not take up places at the London Colleges on financial grounds – fear of getting into debt being foremost.

Supporting art students to study in London colleges

The efforts of creative individuals create networks ‘bottom-up’, not the other way round. Collaboration and culture are generated from having trust, support and empathy for these individuals in their endeavors, not just developing the network ‘top-down’!

The blanket imposition of business rules and networks to cultural development are it is argued inappropriate and stifling of individuals and their creative and cultural initiatives

The Doughnut Effect, cultural dilution of the few by the many and The Noblesse Oblige

Inner City Regeneration

The Doughnut Effect

Although Hull suffers like many other cities from The Doughnut Effect, The Noblesse Oblige  of Hull and its  hinterlands (East Yorkshire and The Humber Region), need to support local cultural initiatives by creative and gifted and talented individuals within the City boundaries, not just through the imposition of business rules and networks where the benefits of the many always always seem to outweigh those of the few, but not the one. Calling Star Trek –  we need your assistance!

Putting the Horse before the Cart – rather than the other way round

Two Cultures: putting one culture before the other counter-culture

We’re not just widgets!

In our inner-city secondary schools, a battle for the hearts and minds of pupils is taking place pupil-by-pupil on a daily basis. In the classroom, the learning culture of the individual pupil is counteracted by the counter-culture of the collective. Often mob rule applies and some pupils are discouraged from studying by the many, where learners may risk becoming labelled as ‘swats’ or worse suffer from bullying out of class. This counter culture often runs in families and spreads through communities and generations as is shown well in the film (and now latterly musical) Billy Elliot: –

Billy Elliot

http://www.visitlondon.com/things-to-do/event/430301-billy-elliot-the-musical-at-the-victoria-palace-theatre

It has been shown and is now recognized that the best way to tackle disruptive pupil behavior is to treat them as individuals and to give them one-on-one support away the classroom. In the majority of cases the needs of the many are prioritized over the needs of the few (again by the blanket imposition of business methods appropriate to mass production but inappropriate to individual human development) – but when the needs of the few are ignored, they may disrupt the needs of the many!

It is a priority that The Noblesse Oblige should identify and embrace Hull’s cultural arbiters individually!

Cultural activity is also potentially disruptive by its very nature. A well-oiled machine by comparison only produces one thing repetitively. Stifling individual creativity in a post-industrial economy that is traditionally suited to a business culture of mass-production is damaging to the whole – where the whole comprises both the many and the few.

Hull: One City: Two Cultures?

Your thoughts and discussion please to Cottingham.tv

Contact

Nick

Alternative Ways Of Connecting With The Electorate – Cottingham.tv is like Barrie McKenzie also on a ‘cultural mission’!

Barry ‘singing for his supper’ for John Lennon in a VW camper van: ‘strewth, starve the lizards – I’m so thirsty I could drink out of a Japanese wrestler’s jockstrap!

These are just the introductory-level salvos of a barrage of increasingly irreverent jokes comprising colourful metaphors – used with connect with the audience quick-fire – and make them buy lots of tins of Fosters lager to quench their thirst in the process!

Edna Everage plays the ‘straight guy’ as the ‘voice of constraint’ and Tommy Cooper plays Arthur McKenzie  read on ..

All aboard for tours and sight-seeing trips!

Amazing opportunity!

The U3A (The University of the Third Age) meet regularly and go on trips and have multiple interest groups including local history, book clubs, needlework, visiting places of interest, hiking, foreign languages and travel. Heather is discussing travel arrangements briefly in this video clip.

 

Editor’s Note: –

Further speakers to follow.

We are constrained by Internet file upload speeds and by limited video output formats of our camera equipment.

 

“4G” Broadband provision to roll out – at last!

Here are the links to broadband including free support for local businesses

The East Riding County Council are preparing for the new revolution in Internet provision

Hull and the East Riding have as urban and rural  provincial northern areas lagged behind the South in broadband provision.

Never mind 4G – we’ve not even got 3G!

Since 2000, “mobile phone black spots” have persisted – and as many will know, rural Internet “3G” access has remained stubbornly abysmal! Black spots are places where no mobile phone reception is available.

3G wireless Internet access as made available on today’s smart phones is not fast enough for broadband, whereas 4G is and forms the new styandard being rolled-out.

One of the problems is the lack of investment. Another is the permanent nature of the old telephone cable  technology and it’s outmoded installation practises

The solution chosen was to erect phone transmitter masts for 4G Wi-Fi connection to households “at the street level” which required digging up old the old copper phone lines.

A chain is only as strong as the weakest link

Unfortunately these old telephone wires were mostly laid unsheathed directly in the ground over 100 years ago and replacing them with underground sheathed fibre-optic cables for Wi-Fi access requires a complete up-ending of all cable routing!

Having tubes and sheathes means the telephone wires and cables can be slotted in and out between broadcast masts located every few hundred metres or so along a street for replacement and extension -without requiring to dig up all the ground including pavements and roads in between!

Has KC held the monopoly on local telecommunications in the region for too long?

Competition improves service provision!

KC’s monopoly (and old technology) extends through much of East Yorkshire as well as Hull. Was a lack of vision to invest in the regions broadband shown by the directors of KC post 1998? Everyone including the Hull Council, KC directors and private shareholders were all too keen to cash-in on the KC share boom when the shares peaked at over £17.00!

For want of a nail ..

Actually it was an unfortunate mistake, as the choice of “ADSL” technology for sending ‘compressed’ broadband including internet ‘narrowcast’ tv along the existing copper telephone wires failed to deliver in terms of range, loading and speed. Instead of choosing the more expensive replacement fiber-optic cables, the technology failed to deliver and had to be abandoned.

See how our region has lagged behind in Internet provision!

Yorkshire Post, Saturday March 07, 2015

Nick

 

Bishop Burton College Lambing Sunday

Getting back in touch with the countryside

Lambing is something that marks the seasons and definitely worth taking young ones to have a look!

Bishop Burton Agricultural College are having an open day!