Time for a “grown-up Debate” about Immigration?

Field work

Speaking from experience having worked in various roles both at home and abroad: –  

it’s something we’re all touched by; something we’re all implicit in.
Almost everyone knows or employs ‘someone who comes from abroad and helps-out’.
We each and all create the demand for our migrant workforce! We share joint and several responsibility!
If we’re sick or old we need a steady supply of nurses, cooks and cleaners. If we grow crops or prepare food we need pickers and packers. If we work professionally we most likely have need for cleaners, carers and child-minders at some point.

More recognition needed for foreign Qualifications

What strikes the editor about many immigrants by talking to them is that they are impressively over-qualified for the work they do: the editor has encountered qualified naval architects, teachers, clerks and engineers who are prepared to leave all behind and start afresh here – even if it means back-breaking work picking tomatoes or scrubbing floors!
Unlike in Germany where the editor worked professionally, we in the UK don’t appear to recognize foreign qualifications! “Anerkennung eines Ausländischen Grades”. People need treating as individuals, not statements or labels!

If we don’t recognize individual foreign qualifications how can we be serious about requiring skilled immigrants to do skilled work and limit immigration?

Enterpreneurial Spirit breaks the Qualifications ‘Glass Ceiling’ Barrier

Further discussions with them reveals how they are prepared to start-up a business on their own if they can’t work their way up an organization by ‘breaking through the qualifications glass floor’ barrier as we’ve shown.

Making Sense of the Economic Growth Figures

Hearing and seeing the signal buried in the noise: much of the economic growth we are currently experiencing in the UK is no doubt due to our immigrants enterprise and hard work – and rising global oil prices.

 

The ethical issues are mounting and people need some reassurances of there being joined-up strategic thinking

To add a counterbalance: how many new immigrants do we need to grow our economy by 1%?

What is the true cost of achieving 1% economic growth in social terms?

Are we taking all the extra schooling required for their offspring, healthcare and birthrate into account when announcing economic growth figures?

Are our existing immigrants offspring going to be able to find work or will they be crowded out by evermore fresh influxes of people?

 

If you are affected by this issue or would like to comment, please contact cottingham.tv

Nick

Related posts:

Sorry, comments are closed for this item.